Positive Self-Talk

If you struggle with your body  or self-image, you probably have some negative self-talk going on. You might have thoughts about yourself that reaffirm that negative self-image. This sometimes makes it difficult during “down time,” when those thoughts that you might otherwise be able to escape with distraction creep in and can be unavoidable. How can you turn the tide on years of self-abuse?

Think of how you treat yourself. Would you tolerate a friend treating you that way? Would you let someone tear you down and call you names? If you have appropriate boundaries with others, you shouldn’t. So why is it acceptable to treat yourself this way? Why do we have different standards for how we treat ourselves and how we treat others? Of course it is not fun to be alone with yourself if you are just plain mean to yourself – it would be like having to spend time with a nasty friend that you can’t get to leave.

One way to start moving from negative self-talk to positive self-talk is through affirmations. Try to figure out what you are telling yourself during the negative self-talk – maybe even start journaling the thoughts that go through your head while you are changing clothes, weighing yourself, or interacting with your body during some other triggering event. The first step is always recognizing that it is going on, and accepting it for what it is. Then, try to flip that negative statement into a positive statement.

One example might be “I am not pretty enough.” This would be a statement that you believe now. You could transform this into a statement that you would like to believe in the future, but may not fully believe now. Such a positive statement might be “Some people think that I am pretty,” and in the future that might become “People see my beauty inside and out.”

If you really struggle to find any positive statement that you feel you could believe in the future, you might choose an appreciation for that part of your body – i.e. be thankful for your legs that allow you to get where you need to go, or a neutral statement – i.e. “I have brown hair,” that is neither negative nor positive, and then move towards positive once you can accept the neutral.

While this seems fairly straight-forward, it does require some repetition. Think of how many times you might have told yourself that negative message – now you need to counteract that by pounding that positive message into your head instead – the key is repetition over time. You might put your affirmations onto an index card and post it in your closet where you get dressed each morning, or on a mirror where you a likely to be critical about your reflection. Some of my clients have recommended the “Think Up” app, which you can use to record your affirmations in your own voice to play back over and over again.

If you struggle particularly in front of the mirror, you might consider covering your mirrors for the time being. If you need your mirror do your hair, for example, you might cover up the rest of the mirror so you can’t see your body, but only your hair. Or, if the mirror is not needed, you might consider getting rid of it for the time being. When you feel that you can catch your negative thoughts and change them into positive thoughts, you can reclaim your mirror.

Also, if you find that you are weighing yourself frequently, and that you are unhappy at the result, that you may consider getting rid of your scale. Sometimes the fixation on a single number can be problematic, and not knowing can alleviate some anxiety. If you do decide to continue weighing yourself, don’t do it more than weekly. If you know that knowing the number stresses you out, you can also request that your doctor not discuss your weight number with you at appointments.

In addition, check your closet. Do you have enough clothes that fit you right now and make you feel good when you wear them? Consider getting rid of your clothes that are too small, or at least getting them out of your closet for now if you can’t bear to part with them. You might even consider trading in your too-small clothes for new ones at a thrift shop such as Clothes Mentor or Plato’s Closet. Putting on clothes that don’t fit can trigger negative self-talk that can be troublesome and can be avoided by wearing clothes that you feel good in.

In short, many of us have negative self-talk that we can choose to transform into positive self-talk. Keep track of negative statements, and turn them into neutral or positive statements that you would like to believe. Repeat, repeat, repeat. Be your own best cheerleader, and watch your self-confidence soar.

Goal setting

So many of us have lofty goals that we hope to achieve some day in the future, but may struggle with how to get there. Large goals can seem overwhelming, and it can be hard to know where to start.

From my frame as a therapist, I would approach this from sort of a “treatment plan” perspective. A treatment plan is a set of specialized goals, objectives and interventions with a set time frame for re-evaluation. This means that a larger goal is stated, and broken down into smaller goals, or objectives, that lead up to a goal. An intervention is the action taken to move towards your goal. If planning and organization are helpful to your mental health, this can be a really concrete way of setting your course.

For example – say your goal is to get a job in a field that is new to you. While this sounds simple, it is not an action that can be taken in one step. You might break down the actions needed to get to your big goal. Objectives might be to re-do your resume, talk with those already in the field, and to search and apply for positions. Within each of those objectives, there are many smaller goals that can be underneath each. For example, to re-do your resume you may need to write a draft, have it edited, and then finalize a copy. You may write out your goals and objectives in a way that flows from the first action you take to the final one. You may also choose to set goals as far as when you would like to complete each task. Then, you would decide what sort of interventions would help you achieve each objective or part of an objective. An example would be that, to have your resume edited, you may need to reach out to someone willing to lend you some time and expertise. You may set an end date of when you would like to re-evaluate your plan.

Maybe after three months or so, you could check to see – what objectives have you completed? What objectives were you unsuccessful at completing or did you not get to yet? Then you can update your plan to reflect what goals you are working on now. You might need to re-evaluate some objectives – sometimes objectives you don’t complete are objectives that just aren’t right for you, and they need to be re-written or scrapped altogether.

Another aspect of change and goal setting for many is a sense of accountability. I’m sure each of us can think of a time when we had a great plan in place, but it just faded away because there was no one there to keep us on track. If this feels familiar to you, you might want to find a friend or family member who is also looking to make positive change in their life, and see if they want to be an accountability partner with you. Perhaps you meet for coffee every month to check in, or just have a phone call now and then to see how goals are going.

I do not recommend doing weight loss challenges. I feel that they encourage disordered eating and negative body image, and also push others to further compare their bodies with others, with can be very troublesome. If you would like to change your eating behaviors, I would recommend moving towards variety, balance and moderation, and just comparing yourself to your own progress.

In our clinic we would say “Stay on your own place mat,” because comparing yourself to others isn’t fair. You don’t have their body, their food preferences, their family, their job or their life. You do what works for you, and that is all you can do. Please read my article on Relationships with food for more reflections from working with clients with eating disorders.

Making changes in our lives can feel daunting and difficult to approach. However, if we break down big goals into more “digestible bites” then it seems much more doable. It is never too late to to follow your authentic self and have the life you dreamed of.